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School for Policy Studies

School for Policy Studies

Jerry Morris Annual Lecture: Incorporating environmental sustainability of diets into public health

Jerry Morris Annual Lecture: Incorporating environmental sustainability of diets into public health

Description

The Centre for Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences presents the 2024 Jerry Morris Memorial Lecture: ‘Incorporating environmental sustainability of diets into public health policy’ by Professor Pete Scarborough from the University of Oxford.


Date: 14th May 2024

Times: 13:00-14:00 Optional lunch (WMB, Room 3.30)

14:00-15:00 Lecture and questions (WMB, Old Council Chamber)


‘Without changes to our diets it will be impossible to achieve the Paris Climate Agreement of limiting temperature increases to 1.5 degrees, or to meet the UK Government’s Net Zero targets. Policy action to change dietary behaviour in the UK and elsewhere has been tempered by powerful interests and government reluctance to be branded a ‘nanny state’. 

Prof Pete Scarborough will consider the challenges and opportunities that arise from building on current public health policy to incorporate both health and sustainability of diets.’

Attendee CategoryCost   
Lecture only - Starts at 2.00 pm£0.00[Read More]
Lunch and Lecture - Starts at 1.00 pm£0.00[Read More]
Centre for Gender and Violence Research Seminar 18/04/2024

Centre for Gender and Violence Research Seminar 18/04/2024

Description

Seminar 6: Understanding Gender and Sexuality: the hidden curriculum in English schools

Online event 13:00-13:50

This is a free event. Joining details will be sent to you upon registration.

Speakers:
Professor Geetanjali Gangoli, Professor Catherine Donovan, Dr Hannah King, Department of Sociology, Durham University


Schools produce regimes of gender and sexuality, including overt and covert curricula based on assumed essentialist differences between girls and boys, reinforced and regulated through uniform, sport and peer pressure.

This paper discusses the findings from a pilot study drawing on
participatory action research techniques with 42 young people in six workshops in Northeast England. The focus of the workshops was to explore with young people their memories about where and how they first encountered being ‘gendered’ and/or having a sexuality.

This paper focuses on those key moments when their behaviours, presentation and/or ideas were subject to facilitators and/or regulators of their gender and/or sexuality. Drawing on the conceptual frameworks of epistemic injustice (Fricker, 2007) and ‘space for action’ (Sharp-Jeff, Kelly and Klein, 2017) we conclude that young people want and need brave active spaces to discuss and ‘do’ gender and sexuality, and to resist essentialism and social control. Schools can be
both places where control is created and entrenched and where it can also be resisted.

Our research suggests that better whole school responses to dismantle regimes of gender and sexuality can be created by and for young
people.

Attendee CategoryCost   
Online Attendance£0.00[Read More]
Centre for Gender and Violence Research Seminar 25/04/2024

Centre for Gender and Violence Research Seminar 25/04/2024

Description

Seminar 7: A feature, not a bug: The ‘new’ victim blame

Online event 13:00-13:50 GMT

This is a free event. Joining details will be sent to you upon registration.

Speakers:

Dr Amy Beddows, Edinburgh Napier University

My PhD research showed that victim blame is an inadequate concept for understanding societal responses towards women who have experienced violence (Beddows, 2022).

As well as blamed, women felt judged, disrespected, and objectified by professionals across a range of agencies and sectors. They also felt that these responses were a reaction to who they were (their gender, age, sexuality, race and ethnicity, class, ability) more than their experiences of men’s violence.
Victimism - reducing women to the restrictive status of ‘victim’ (Barry, 1979) - and responsibilisation (Rose, 2000) - making women solely responsible for recovering from and preventing men’s violence - are more useful concepts for
understanding the harmful ways that agencies respond to survivors.

These processes are enacted through different aspects of practice: individual staff; policies and processes; physical environments; reputations and expectations.
These processes maintain the status quo by keeping focus and accountability on victims rather than perpetrators, professionals, or systems; therefore, they should be understood as a feature, rather than a bug, of patriarchal
societies.

Creating space for survivors – space for action, spaces to speak, and spaces to be and be with – can challenge negative messages and instead communicate
respect, dig

Attendee CategoryCost   
Online Attendance£0.00[Read More]
Centre for Gender and Violence Research Seminar 09/05/2024

Centre for Gender and Violence Research Seminar 09/05/2024

Description

Seminar 8: The use of family courts to address domestic abuse in England and Wales.

Online event 13:00-13:50 GMT

This is a free event. Joining details will be sent to you upon registration.

Speakers:

Dr Ludivine Garside, University of Bristol, School of Law

Domestic abuse is a known concern in many types of family law cases, both private and public. It affects over half of private child arrangement cases, and two thirds of birth mothers in samples of children subject to care proceedings. However, it remains unknown which types of court users receive protection through Non-Molestation or Occupation Orders granted by family courts. New administrative datasets and linkages can supplement the information already available from national statistics, providing an evidence base to understand how family court users approach domestic abuse matters, their experiences of the family justice system, and how the court responds.
This project is one of the first to gain approval from HM Courts & Tribunals Services (HMCTS) to use de-identified versions of their family court data and linkage to the Children and Families Court Advisory Support Service (Cafcass) datasets, insofar as courts refer the case to Cafcass for advice about the safety and best interests of children. The project describes the court journeys and legal outcomes associated to different types of individuals and cases in England and Wales, and how the added understanding at population-level can focus and support discussions about the use of family courts to address domestic abuse.

Attendee CategoryCost   
Online Attendance£0.00[Read More]
Centre for Gender and Violence Research Seminar 16/05/2024

Centre for Gender and Violence Research Seminar 16/05/2024

Description

Seminar 9: A City of Men? Youth Masculinities and Everyday Gendered Violences in Urban India

Online event 13:00-13:50 GMT

This is a free event. Joining details will be sent to you upon registration.

Speakers:

Dr Shannon Philip, University of East Anglia

In this talk I explore the gendering of everyday urban spaces and the social production of gendered violence.
Through ethnographic data collected by ‘hanging out’ with young Indian men in New Delhi, I reveal the ways in which their youth masculinities are constructed and performed, and how these in turn produce hostility, fear and violence for young women and girls accessing the same urban spaces. Through weaving together material from myriad urban sites like gyms, bars, trains, street corners, night clubs, gay cruising parks as well as shopping malls, I explore how there is an attempt to make the city a masculine space, with a hypersexualisation of young women in the same spaces. However, this process is not even or uniform, with several masculine anxieties and vulnerabilities also emerging in young men’s claims on the city from queer and non-masculine bodies. In this way, the urban space becomes an interesting palimpsest to explore the politics of gender, class, youth, sexualities and violences on an everyday level.

 

Attendee CategoryCost   
Online Attendance£0.00[Read More]
Centre for Gender and Violence Research Seminar 22/05/2024

Centre for Gender and Violence Research Seminar 22/05/2024

Description

Seminar 10: The politics of naming and construction: University policies on gender-based violence in the UK

Online event 13:00-13:50 GMT

This is a free event. Joining details will be sent to you upon registration.

Speakers:

Professor Sundari Anitha, Dr Ana Jordan and Dr Nicola Chanamuto, University of Sheffield & Lincoln

It is widely recognised that the problematisation of a social phenomenon is a political process that both constructs the problem and, in doing so, suggests some possible remedies and occludes others. Based on our sector-wide analysis of policies to address gender-based violence (GBV) in 129 UK universities, we examine how the ‘problem’ of GBV is conceptualised in institutional policies. 

Attendee CategoryCost   
Online Attendance£0.00[Read More]